Q&A

Q&A related to Ar Don Go.

Press: 
How many pictures were taken?
The song was broken down and visualized into 16 different sections. A total of 11,426 photos were taken and edited.
What equipment and software was used?
A Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II camera and flatbed scanner were used to capture the content. Everything was edited in Photoshop and AfterEffects.
How long did it take?
437 days, which is equal to 1 year, two months, and 11 days, or if you want a bigger number 629,280 minutes. This was between November 10th 2014, when the project was first introduced and January 21st when it was released to the public. There was a seven month preproduction period that took place in Juarez, Doha, Istanbul, Delhi, and Kathmandu. It included storyboarding, drafts, experiments and the collection of materials. An estimated 252 hours of filming took place over a two-week period at a small apartment on the outskirts of Kathmandu. Postproduction took an estimated 1008 hours and was completed in Jingdezhen, China.
A collection of quotes relevant to Ar Don Go.

“This was the most insane creative collaboration ever. Ellis was always in a different country for every meeting, he had to learn lots of Sierra Leonean Krio to understand the track and he always asked the best questions. I was very comfortable with him as creative lead on the music video. I loved his take on the themes of the music, I loved the vibrant colors he used in his other pieces of art and his ability to imagine.”
— Sengeh

“This is not just a song and video that relates only to Sierra Leone and in making this I didn’t want to narrowly define diversity in terms of African culture. Think of it, this is a Sierra Leonean rap video filmed in Kathmandu made by an Upstate New Yorker.  It’s not about race and it’s not about looks. It’s about how new experiences not only replace old ones but provide layered views of how we see ourselves, and the world we inhabit. I find that it is through these new narratives, maps, discoveries, often propelled by happenstance, where we can learn how to be influenced, and influence, a culture other than ones own.”
— Ellis

“My hope is that people all around the world especially youth in Sierra Leone get to see the piece. I want them to ask questions about the meanings behind each scene and hopefully that will make them go and explore to find answers. Every time I watch the video, I find new meanings and that is tremendously powerful!”
— Sengeh

“I said yes to this on one of those days where I felt invincible, not taking into account that I had never made anything like it or knew how to. I fooled Sengeh most of the way until I actually found the know how to create something that is by far the most ambitious piece I’ve ever made and I am by far the proudest I have ever been. This work became incredibly personal on both sides and because of that we glimpsed an intimate part of each others lives on the other side of the world. I really think individually we are leaving this collaboration better off than when we went in.”
— Ellis

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